Curriculum

Curriculum Overview

The College’s curriculum prepares graduates to be APPE-, team-, and practice-ready. The curriculum also develops students to be dynamic and thoughtful leaders, while motivating learners to become innovators in all realms of pharmacy practice.

SUCOP offers a 3 calendar-year entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy program that supports and prepares students to meet the college’s educational outcomes. All courses in the curriculum are mapped to ACPE Appendix 1 to ensure the program contains all necessary components. The first two professional years (PY1 and PY2) are divided into four 11-week quarters which consist of 10 weeks of instruction, 1 week of final assessments, and a 2-week break before the next quarter begins. The third professional year (PY3) is divided into four 12-week quarters which consist of two 6-week rotation blocks with a one-week break between each. The minimum credit hours required for program completion is 174.

Educational Outcomes

Domain 1:  Foundational Knowledge

1.1

Learner (Learner):  Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e., pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care.

1.1.1

Develop and demonstrate depth and breadth of knowledge in pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences.

1.1.2.

Articulate how knowledge in foundational sciences is integral to clinical reasoning; evaluation of future advances in medicine; supporting health and wellness initiatives; and delivery of contemporary pharmacy services.

1.1.3

Integrate knowledge from foundational sciences to explain how specific drugs or drug classes work and evaluate their potential value in individuals and populations.

1.1.4

Apply knowledge in foundational sciences to solve therapeutic problems and advance patient-centered care.

1.1.5

Retrieve and critically analyze scientific literature related to drugs and disease to enhance clinical decision making.

1.1.6

Identify and critically analyze emerging theories, information, and technologies that may impact patient-centered care and population based care.

Domain 2:  Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1

Patient-centered care (Caregiver):  Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.1.1

Collect subjective and objective evidence related to patient, medications, allergies/adverse reactions, and disease, by performing patient assessment (including physical assessment) from chart/electronic health records, pharmacist records and patient/family interviews.

2.1.2

Interpret evidence and patient data.

2.1.3

Prioritize patient needs.

2.1.4

Formulate evidence based care plans, assessment, and recommendations.

2.1.5

Implement patient care plans.

2.1.6

Monitor the patient and adjust care plan as needed.

2.1.7

Document patient care related activities.

2.1.8

Reconcile patient’s medications when transitioning care from one setting to another.

2.2

Medication use systems management (Manager):  Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.2.1

Compare and contrast the components of typical medication use systems (process comprised of medication prescribing, order processing, dispensing, administration, and effect monitoring) in different pharmacy practice settings.

2.2.2

Describe the role of the pharmacist in impacting the safety and efficacy of each component of a typical medication use system (i.e. procurement, storage, prescribing, transcription, dispensing, administration, monitoring, and documentation).

2.2.3

Utilize technology to optimize the medication use system.

2.2.4

Identify and utilize human, financial, and physical resources to optimize the medication use system.

2.2.5

Manage healthcare needs of patients during transitions of care

2.2.6

Apply standards, guidelines, best practices, and established processes related to safe and effective medication use.

2.2.7

Utilize continuous quality improvement techniques in the medication use process.

2.2.8

Apply safe and accurate compounding skills to prepare medications.

2.3

Health and wellness (Promoter):  Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.3.1

Describe systematic preventive care, using risk assessment, risk reduction, screening, education, and immunizations.

2.3.2

Provide prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to improve health and wellness.

2.3.3

Participate with interprofessional healthcare team members in the management of, and health promotion for, all patients.

2.3.4

Evaluate personal, social, economic, and environmental conditions to maximize health and wellness.

2.4

Population-based care (Provider):  Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-base best practices.

2.4.1

Assess the healthcare status and needs of a targeted patient population

2.4.2

Develop and provide an evidence-based approach that considers the cost, care, access, and satisfaction needs of a targeted patient population.

2.4.3

Participate in population health management by evaluating and adjusting interventions to maximize health.

Domain 3:  Approach to Practice and Care

3.1

Problem Solving (Problem Solver): Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.1.1

Identify and define the primary problem.

3.1.2

Define goals and alternative goals.

3.1.3

Explore multiple solutions by organizing, prioritizing, and defending each possible solution.

3.1.4

Anticipate positive and negative outcomes by reviewing assumptions, inconsistencies, and unintended consequences.

3.1.5

Implement the most viable solution, including monitoring parameters, to measure intended and unintended consequences.

3.1.6

Reflect on the solution implemented and its effects to improve future performance.

3.2

Educator (Educator): Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.2.1

Conduct a learning needs assessment of constituents who would benefit from pharmacist-delivered education (e.g. patients/caregivers, technicians and interns, pharmacy students, fellow pharmacists, other healthcare providers, legislators).

3.2.2

Select the most effective techniques/strategies to achieve learning objectives.

3.2.3

Demonstrate the ability to coordinate educational efforts with other healthcare providers, when appropriate, to ensure a consistent, comprehensive, and team-based encounter.

3.2.4

Ensure instructional content contains the most current information relevant for the intended audience.

3.2.5

Adapt instruction and deliver to the intended audience.

3.2.6

Assess audience comprehension.

3.3

Patient Advocacy (Advocate): Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.3.1

Empower patients to take responsibility for, and control of, their health.

3.3.2

Assist patients in navigating the complex healthcare system.

3.3.3

Ensure patients obtain the resources and care required in an efficient and cost-effective manner (e.g., trial to social and/or healthcare services).

3.3.4

Utilize knowledge of private and public health insurance to assist patients and care givers to obtain medication and related parapharmaceuticals.

3.4

Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator): Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.4.1

Establish a climate of shared values and mutual respect necessary to meet patient care needs.

3.4.2

Define clear roles and responsibilities for team members to optimize outcomes for specific patient care encounters.

3.4.3

Communicate in a manner that values team-based decision making and shows respect for contributions from other areas of expertise.

3.4.4

Foster accountability and leverage expertise to form and participate in a highly functioning team (one that includes the patient, family, and community) and promote shared patient-centered problem solving.

3.5

Cultural sensitivity (Includer): Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.5.1

Recognize the collective identify and norms of different cultures without overgeneralizing (i.e., recognize and avoid biases and stereotyping).

3.5.2

Demonstrate an attitude that is respectful of different cultures.

3.5.3

Assess a patient’s health literacy and modify communication strategies to meet the patient’s needs.

3.5.4

Safely and appropriately incorporate patients’ cultural beliefs and practices into health and wellness care plans.

3.6

Communication (Communicator): Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

3.6.1

Interview patients using an organized structure, specific questioning techniques (e.g., motivational interviewing), and medical terminology adapted for the audience.

3.6.2

Actively listen and ask appropriate open and close-ended questions to gather information.

3.6.3

Use available technology and other media to assist with communication as appropriate.

3.6.4

Use effective interpersonal skills to establish rapport and build trusting relationships.

3.6.5

Communicate assertively, persuasively, confidently, and clearly.

3.6.6

Demonstrate empathy when interacting with others.

3.6.7

Deliver and obtain feedback to assess learning and promote goal setting and goal attainment.

3.6.8

Develop professional documents pertinent to organization needs (e.g. monographs, policy documents).

3.6.9

Document patient care activities clearly, concisely, and accurately using appropriate medical terminology.

Domain 4: Personal and Professional Development

4.1

Self-awareness (Self-aware): Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.1.1

Maintain motivation, attention, and a desire to learn during courses and work-related activities.

4.1.2

Identify, create, implement, evaluate and modify plans for personal and professional development for the purpose of individual growth.

4.1.3

Demonstrate persistence and flexibility in all situations.

4.1.4

Strive for accuracy and precision by displaying a willingness to recognize, correct, and learn from errors.

4.1.5

Consciously work to solve personal and interpersonal problems to manage stress.

4.1.6

Seek personal, professional, or academic support to address personal limitations.

4.2

Leadership (Leader): Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.2.1

Exhibit management and leadership skills (e.g., delegation, team work, timeliness, ability to accept constructive criticism).

4.2.2

Develop relationships, value diverse opinions, and understand individual strengths and weaknesses to promote teamwork.

4.2.3

Empower team members by actively listening, gathering input or feedback, and fostering collaboration.

4.2.4

Display competency in handling confrontational situations and conflict management.

4.3

Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Innovator): Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

4.3.1

Develop new ideas and approaches to improve quality or overcome barriers to advance the profession.

4.3.2

Demonstrate creative decision making and initiative when confronted with novel problems or challenges.

4.3.3

Apply entrepreneurial skills within a simulated activity.

4.3.4

Conduct a risk-benefit analysis for implementation of an innovative idea or simulated entrepreneurial activity.

4.4

Professionalism (Professional): Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given by the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

4.4.1

Demonstrate altruism, integrity, trustworthiness, and respect in all interactions.

4.4.2

Deliver patient-centered care in a manner that is legal, ethical, and compassionate.

4.4.3

Engage in the profession of pharmacy and demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning.

4.4.4

Exhibit a positive attitude and confidence when working with others.
SUCOP Curriculum and Electives
PY1 1st QUARTER (SUMMER)

CrHr

PHR5000 Intro to the Prac of Pharm

1

PHR5001 Intro to Health Care System

2

PHR5002 Human Physiology

4

PHR5003 Pharmaceutics I

3

PHR5004 Pharm Calculations w/Lab

3

PHR5005 Pharmacy Law and Ethics

3

PHR5007 Patient Care Lab

1

PHR5008 IPPE Community

1

TOTAL

18

 

PY1 2ND QUARTER (FALL)

CrHr

PHR5200 Immunology

3

PHR5201 Medication Safety

3

PHR5202 Biochemistry

4

PHR5203 Pharmaceutics II w/Lab

3

PHR5204 Comm & Collab Sol”ns

2

PHR5205 IPPE Community

1

PHR5206 Patient Care Lab

1

TOTAL

17

 

PY1 3RD QUARTER (WINTER)

CrHr

PHR5400 Clin Micro/Antibiotics Basics

3

PHR5401 Self Care

3

PHR5402 Research and Lit Eval I

3

PHR5403 Intro to Pharm/MedChem

1

PHR5404 Public Health Issues

2

PHR5405 Biotechnology

1

PHR5406 IPPE Community

1

PHR5407 Patient Care Lab

1

TOTAL

15

 

PY1 4TH QUARTER (SPRING)

CrHr

PHR5600 IPPE Hospital

4

PHR5601 IPPE Commuity

1

PHR5602 Patient Care Lab

2

PHR5603 Sterile Dosages w/Lab

2

TOTAL

9

 

PY2 1st QUARTER (SUMMER)

CrHr

PHR6000 Pharm/MedChem I

4

PHR6001 Therapeutics I

4

PHR6002 Patient Care Lab

1

PHR6003 Biopharm and Kinetics I

2

PHR Elective I

2

PHR Elective II

2

PHR6004 Pathophys

3

TOTAL

18

 

PY2 2ND QUARTER (FALL)

CrHr

PHR6200 Pharm Prac Manage

2

PHR6201 Pharm/MedChem II

5

PHR6202 Patient Care Lab

1

PHR6203 Biopharm & Kinetics II

2

PHR Elective III

2

PHR6204 Therapeutics II

6

TOTAL

18

 

PY2 3RD QUARTER (WINTER)

CrHr

PHR6400 Clinical Nutrition

2

PHR6401 Pharm/MedChem III

5

PHR6402 Therapeutics III

6

PHR6403 Patient Care Lab

1

PHR Elective IV

2

PHR6404 Genomics

2

TOTAL

18

 

PY2 4TH QUARTER (SPRING)

CrHr

PHR6600 Economics/outcomes

2

PHR6601 Therapeutics IV

6

PHR6602 Pharm/MedChem IV

5

PHR6603 Patient Care Lab

1

PHR6604 Research & Lit Eval II

1

PHR6605 Clin App Kinetics lab

1

PHR6606 Profess Seminar Course

1

Total

18

**PY3:  7 Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences of  6 weeks (community pharmacy, ambulatory patient care, hospital/health system pharmacy, inpatient general medicine patient care, 1 selective direct patient care, 2 electives) plus a Research Project and NAPLEX Review

Elective List
List is subject to change

Course Number

Elective Name

PHR 6800 Addiction and Substances of Abuse
PHR 6801 Advanced Drug Delivery
PHR 6802 Advanced Ambulatory Care
PHR 6803 Advanced Self Care
PHR 6804 Aromatherapy Science
PHR 6805 Clinical Ethics
PHR 6806 Drug Induced Disease
PHR 6807 Geriatrics
PHR 6808 Heart Failure
PHR 6809 Integrative Therapeutics
PHR 6810 Introduction to Residency
PHR 6811 Landmark Trials I
PHR 6812 Landmark Trials II
PHR 6813 Leadership
PHR 6814 Learn to Teach
PHR 6815 Managed Care
PHR 6816 Medical Spanish
PHR 6817 Mental Health
PHR 6818 NanoMedicine
PHR 6819 Palliative Care
PHR 6820 Pediatrics
PHR 6821 Veterinary Medicine
PHR 6822 Wilderness Medicine
PHR 6823 Women’s Health
PHR 6824 Xenobiotic Toxicology
PHR 6825 Independent Study
PHR 6826* Elective I-Sensory Physiology
PHR 6827* Elective II-Landmark Trials III
PHR 6828* Elective III-Advanced Compounding
PHR 6829* Elective IV
PHR 6830* Elective V
PHR 6831* Elective VI
PHR 6832 Independent Study II
PHR 6833 Independent Study III
PHR 6834 Independent Study IV
SUCOP Course Descriptions

FIRST PROFESSIONAL YEAR

PHR 5000:  Introduction/Initiation to the Practice of Pharmacy

This course will cover the history of pharmacy, the patient-centered care concept, various pharmacy organizations, professionalism, and teamwork. The delivery of patient-centered care will be examined from different types of services in various settings. This will help to introduce a variety of pharmacy practices to the students.

PHR 5001:  Introduction to Health Care System

An overview of the basic structures and operations of the U.S. health care delivery system, including its historical origins, the changing roles of the components of the system, and the technical, economic, political, and social forces responsible for these changes.

PHR 5002:  Human Physiology

This course provides the student with the understanding of the physiological basis of body functions to maintain homeostasis. The essential concepts of physiology and the mechanisms involved in body functions are discussed in the cellular, molecular, tissue, and organ system levels. Emphasis is placed in understanding the integrated regulation of various body processes among the major systems to maintain homeostasis. A prior knowledge of anatomy, cell biology, molecular cell mechanisms, and basic concepts of physiological control mechanisms is required prior to taking this course. Both in class lectures and examinations will introduce aspects of medical physiology through the application of knowledge to novel clinical scenarios.

PHR 5003:  Pharmaceutics I

This course underlines the basic physiochemical principles that govern pharmaceutical systems, particularly with regard to dosage formulation and evaluation of pharmacokinetic and dynamic principles with emphasis on solid and liquid dosage forms.

PHR 5004:  Pharmaceutical Calculations with Lab

Students will be taught to perform accurate compounding and dosage calculations for solid and liquid dosage forms, injectable medications, and extemporaneously compounded prescription products to ensure the safety and efficacy of patients’ therapy.  

PHR 5005:  Pharmacy Law and Ethics

This course focuses on the laws, regulations, and related ethical issues relating to the practice of pharmacy. The regulation and control of drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, mail order, and “internet” pharmacy will also be presented.

PHR 5007:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated cases and activities.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of topics learned throughout the first year curriculum.

PHR 5200:  Immunology

This course provides the fundamental background of the human immune system. Topics include composition and function of immune system, anti-microbial immunity, disorders of the immune system, tumor immunology, transplantation rejection, and clinical application of immunology including therapeutic antibodies, vaccines, and diagnostic tools.

PHR 5201:  Medication Safety

Students will learn about the mechanism and roots of medication errors and their consequences on patients and health care in general. Mechanisms to promote medication safety will also be examined.  This course is an introduction to the availability of various technologies applicable to the delivery of pharmacy care, their impact on pharmacy practice, and their applications to patient care.

PHR 5202:  Biochemistry

A review of the structure, physical/chemical properties, function, and interactions of amino acids, peptides and proteins, nucleotides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and hybrid molecules with an emphasis on application to medication and clinical uses.

PHR 5203:  Pharmaceutics II with Lab

This course is designed to introduce pharmacy students to the contemporary compounding of non-sterile dosage forms.  Students will practice compounding powders, capsules, troches, balms, creams, ointments, gels, suppositories, solutions, suspensions, and emulsions. Guidance and standards for the preparation of compounding formulations will also be covered.

PHR 5204:  Communication and Collaborative Solutions

This course will cover interviewing techniques, factors that impact communication, medication histories, patient counseling, and presentation skills. The mechanism of conflicts will be explored and the techniques to establish a harmonious working relationship or to defuse/prevent conflicts at the workplace will be taught. Projects, presentations, simulations, and mock counseling sessions will provide opportunities to practice and refine these communication skills.

PHR 5206:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated cases and activities.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of topics learned throughout the first year curriculum.

PHR 5400:  Clinical Microbiology and Antibiotics Basics

This course is designed for students who have had an introduction to basic microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on the aspects of clinical microbiology and anti-microbial treatment that pertain to pharmaceutical science, pharmacotherapeutics, and patient-centered care. The course will discuss the principles of infectious diseases and common infectious diseases of individual organ systems. A comprehensive overview of antibiotic basics will also be presented.

PHR 5401:  Self Care

This course will offer an overview of conditions and products that patients use in self-care treatment. The course will focus on the pharmacotherapy and the role of the pharmacist in disease state management related to self-care (using nonprescription and herbal therapy). Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans. These plans will include rationale for drug use, selection and dosing regimens, expected outcomes of drug therapy, key monitoring parameters, clinically important drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, counseling, and compliance issues.  This course will also help to introduce students to clinical scenarios likely to be encountered during their Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

PHR 5402:  Research Design and Literature Evaluation I

Students will become familiarized with the skills required to handle different types of drug information questions and the techniques on how to fully evaluate biomedical literature and health care related issues. Students will also be introduced to the different phases of research and processes involved in the drug approval process. Application of the information taught in the course will be emphasized throughout.

PHR 5403:  Introduction to Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry

This course provides background information on the molecular, cellular, and physiologic basis of drug action, the influence of chemical and physical properties in structure-activity relationships, drug chemistry, mechanism of drug action, drug metabolism, drug interactions, toxicity profiles, and pharmacokinetics in order to prepare the student for the Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry I-IV sequence.

PHR 5404:  Public Health Issues

This course is designed to survey the basic principles of public health practice from a pharmacy perspective.   Information discussed will include an introduction to the infrastructure of public health, analytical tools employed in public health, biopsychosocial perspectives of public health problems, health promotion and disease prevention, quality in public health, and legal/ethical concerns.  

PHR 5405:  Biotechnology

This course provides an introduction to biotechnology and its impact on the drug development and practice of pharmacy. Topics include how biotechnology is used to produce biotech drugs, how those drugs work, and the predicted potential and current limitations of biotech drugs.

PHR 5407:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated cases and activities.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of topics learned throughout the first year curriculum.

PHR 5602:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated cases and activities.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of topics learned throughout the first year curriculum. 

PHR 5603:  Sterile Dosages Lab

Students will be familiarized with the organization and administration of an admixture program, requirements for clean room setup, equipment used in preparing sterile preparations, preparation of compounded sterile preparations, regulations governing preparation, distribution and storage of compounded sterile products, reviewing physician orders for parenteral products, calculation of dosages of parenteral medications, and administration of different types of parenteral products. Students will have the opportunity to practice in the laboratory the techniques related to the compounding of sterile dosage forms. Students will be required to demonstrate competency in safe preparation of sterile dosage forms.

PHR 5008, PHR 5205, PHR 5406, and PHR 5601:  Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Community

Community Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences are a four course sequence requiring a minimum of 160 contact hours, divided and completed by quarter; 40 hours during the summer quarter, 45 hours during the fall and winter quarters and 30 hours during the spring quarter. These courses introduce the student to the philosophy, socialization, and practice of the profession of pharmacy through a longitudinal experience in a community pharmacy practice environment. The student will practice the technical skills necessary to be a successful pharmacist while exploring the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes.

PHR 5600:  IPPE Hospital

Institutional Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience is an experience requiring a minimum of 160 contact hours.  This course re-enforces the student’s awareness of the philosophy, socialization, and practice of the profession of pharmacy through an institutional pharmacy practice environment. The student will practice the technical skills necessary to be a successful pharmacist while exploring the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes.

SECOND PROFESSIONAL YEAR

PHR 6000:  Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry I

This course is designed to coordinate with the Pharmacotherapeutics sequence and provides the chemical and pharmacological basics for the Pharmacotherapeutics courses.  This course furnishes the details of molecular, cellular, and physiologic basis of drug action, along with the influence of chemical and physical properties of drugs in structure-activity relationships, drug chemistry, mechanism of drug action, drug metabolism, drug interactions, toxicity profiles, and pharmacokinetics.

PHR 6001:  Pharmacotherapeutics I

This course focuses on the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of disease states.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of knowledge and skills gained from previous courses with pathophysiology and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans.

PHR 6002:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated patient cases.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics knowledge as well as physical assessment and point-of-care device skills via working through modules. In these modules, students will practice medication reconciliation, SOAP note/care plan development, patient presentation, drug information, and patient counseling skills.  The importance of developing a rationale to support all recommendations will also be a focus of this course.

PHR 6003:  Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics I

This course will examine the interrelationship of the physicochemical properties of drugs, their dosage forms, and routes of administration on the rate and extent of systemic absorption. This will involve study of factors that influence stability of the drug in a drug product, the release of the drug from its drug product, the rate of dissolution/release of the drug at absorption site, and systemic absorption. Physiological factors influencing drug absorption, biopharmaceutic consideration of dosage form design and drug delivery systems, bioavailability and bioequivalence, and drug metabolism and excretion will be emphasized. The quantitative aspects of the ADME processes and determination of pharmacokinetic parameters from plasma profile will also be presented. 

PHR 6004:  Pathophysiology

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of pathophysiology and requires a solid background of anatomy and physiology. The course focuses in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to changes and alterations in human physiologic function and human responses. The students will learn how pathophysiological processes affect manifestation and progression of a disease state within the body, including the resulting primary and secondary effects. Both in-class lectures and examinations will introduce application of knowledge to novel clinical scenarios. 

PHR 6200:  Pharmacy Practice Management

Emphasis is given to the managerial aspects of pharmacy practice within the different settings of the health care system. This course provides the basic financial and operational management, knowledge, and skills necessary for a successful professional practice.

PHR 6201:  Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry II

This course is designed to coordinate with the Pharmacotherapeutics sequence and provides the chemical and pharmacological basics for the Pharmacotherapeutics courses.  This course furnishes the details of molecular, cellular, and physiologic basis of drug action, along with the influence of chemical and physical properties of drugs in structure-activity relationships, drug chemistry, mechanism of drug action, drug metabolism, drug interactions, toxicity profiles, and pharmacokinetics.

PHR 6202:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated patient cases.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics knowledge, as well as physical assessment and point-of-care device skills via working through modules. In these modules, students will practice medication reconciliation, SOAP note/care plan development, patient presentation, drug information, and patient counseling skills.  The importance of developing a rationale to support all recommendations will also be a focus of this course.

PHR 6203:  Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics II

This course will build on Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics I and will focus on the clinical applications of the principles of pharmacokinetics. It will be an integrated course between the basic pharmacokinetics and clinical sciences incorporating clinical case studies. Clinical pharmacokinetics of selected drugs which are routinely monitored will be presented with the aim of designing a safe and effective dose regimen for patients based on physiological conditions and disease states.

PHR 6204:  Pharmacotherapeutics II

This course focuses on the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of disease states.

Emphasis will be placed on the integration of knowledge and skills gained from previous courses with pathophysiology and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans.

PHR 6400:  Clinical Nutrition

Students will learn the basic principles of enteral and parenteral nutrition. Students will also learn how to write/adjust a parenteral/enteral nutrition formula adapted to patients’ disease states. In addition, students will learn how to monitor the effects of nutrition on patients.

PHR 6401:  Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry III

This course is designed to coordinate with the Pharmacotherapeutics sequence and provides the chemical and pharmacological basics for the Pharmacotherapeutics courses. This course furnishes the details of molecular, cellular, and physiological basis of drug action, along with the influence of chemical and physical properties of drugs in structure-activity relationships, drug chemistry, mechanism of drug action, drug metabolism, drug interactions, toxicity profiles, and pharmacokinetics. 

PHR 6402:  Pharmacotherapeutics III

This course focuses on the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of disease states.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of knowledge and skills gained from previous courses with pathophysiology and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans.

PHR 6403:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated patient cases.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics knowledge, as well as physical assessment and point-of-care device skills via working through modules. In these modules, students will practice medication reconciliation, SOAP note/care plan development, patient presentation, drug information, and patient counseling skills.  The importance of developing a rationale to support all recommendations will also be a focus of this course.

PHR 6404:  Pharmacogenomics:  Personalized Medicine

This course will present an introduction to the human genome, the sciences of genetics, and how they relate to medication and treatments. The goal of the course is to equip students with basic knowledge of the principles, concepts, and practical implications of pharmacogenomics to provide optimized drug therapy and patient care for individuals.

PHR 6600:  Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes

Students are introduced to the principles and tools of pharmacoeconomics and outcome assessments that are commonly used to study the impact of pharmaceutical care services on the health and health care of a patient or community.

PHR 6601:  Pharmacotherapeutics IV

This course focuses on the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of disease states.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of knowledge and skills gained from previous courses with pathophysiology and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans.

PHR 6602:  Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry IV

This course is designed to coordinate with the Pharmacotherapeutics sequence and provides the chemical and pharmacological basics for the Pharmacotherapeutics courses. This course furnishes the details of molecular, cellular, and physiological basis of drug action, along with the influence of chemical and physical properties of drugs in structure-activity relationships, drug chemistry, mechanism of drug action, drug metabolism, drug interactions, toxicity profiles, and pharmacokinetics.

PHR 6603:  Patient Care Lab

This course focuses on applying the didactic knowledge and skills learned throughout the pharmacy curriculum to simulated patient cases.  Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics knowledge, as well as physical assessment and point-of-care device skills via working through modules. In these modules, students will practice medication reconciliation, SOAP note/care plan development, patient presentation, drug information, and patient counseling skills.  The importance of developing a rationale to support all recommendations will also be a focus of this course.

PHR 6604:  Research Design and Literature Evaluation II

Students will apply the skills acquired in Research Design and Literature Evaluation I to handle different types of drug information questions and the techniques on how to fully evaluate health care related issues. In addition, students will review drug development with emphasis on clinical trials. Application of the information taught in the course will be emphasized throughout.

PHR 6605:  Clinical Application of Pharmacokinetics Lab

This course introduces hands-on experience in solving problems relevant to the clinical pharmacokinetic services in the hospital, expanding the concepts learned in Basic Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics I and II. Emphasis will be on individual or customized dosing and drug dosing intervals for specific drugs requiring serum concentration monitoring for guided therapy.

PHR 6606:  Professional Seminar Course

This course will help students prepare for their Third Professional Year Projects.  Students may choose from three tracks:  business plans, research project, or topic presentation.

THIRD PROFESSIONAL YEAR

PHR 7000, 7001, 7200, 7201, 7400, 7401, 7600:  Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE)

The students will go through seven experiential education experiences. The experiences are balanced between three areas; including community/ambulatory care, hospital/health system, and elective experiences. Required rotations will emphasize patient care, systems management, and medication distribution within an interprofessional team. This will be the time for students to integrate and apply their knowledge to real patients’ situations. Elective APPE are structured to allow students to explore specific areas of practice, furthering the breadth and the depth of experiences needed to enhance professional growth.

PHR 7601:  Research Project and NAPLEX/MPJE Preparation

This course is intended to develop a student’s ability to evaluate and synthesize pertinent literature and effectively communicate a pharmacotherapy-related topic in a professional manner.  Course is pass/fail.  Students must pass the course as a mandatory academic requirement for graduation.

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES

PHR 6800:  Addiction and Substances of Abuse

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the pathophysiology associated with addiction, an overview of substances of abuse including their effects on the nervous system and other organ systems as well as management of acute intoxication and withdrawal from the substance. Additionally, students will be exposed to non-pharmacological approaches in addiction management and are expected to apply knowledge gained during the course to contribute to educational and outreach efforts in the community.  

PHR 6801:  Advanced Drug Delivery

This course provides an opportunity to explore the basic principles and technology of advanced drug delivery systems and devices for controlled, sustained, and targeted delivery of drugs. This will include a  systematic study of solid oral modified- release dosage forms such as coated beads, granules, microencapsulated drug, osmotic pump, repeat action tablets,  transdermal, iontophoretic, intranasal and brain-targeted, ophthalmic, and nanotechnology-based products.

PHR 6802:  Advanced Ambulatory Care

This course will help reinforce disease state management concepts learned in Pharmacotherapeutics I and II. Students will learn how to set up an ambulatory care service and run a clinic. This is an active learning course. Since most of the concepts are being re-introduced, the course utilizes case-based teaching.

PHR 6803:  Advanced Self Care

This course focuses on the role of durable medical equipment, medical supplies, and other self-care products in the medical management of patients in the outpatient community setting.

PHR 6804:  Aromatherapy Science

This elective course is designed to cover commonly used essential oils and their therapeutic uses, details of toxicity, bioactivity, contraindications, and clinical studies. Lecture topics include historical background, aromatherapy practice, chemistry of essential oils, bioactivity of essential oils, science of smell, safety issues, and clinical studies.

PHR 6805:  Clinical Ethics

This course explores the background, history, and components of ethical decision-making in the professional medical environment.  There is additional focus on the ethics involved in human subjects research (both pre-clinical and clinical) and a pharmacist’s dispensing rights and responsibilities.

PHR 6806:  Drug Induced Disease

This course will cover the mechanism of drug-induced diseases that affect a variety of organ systems.  Students will examine offending drugs involved in these adverse drug reactions and examine the prevention, detection, and the most appropriate management of drug-induced diseases. Content in this elective class will integrate and build upon the clinical knowledge learned in pharmacotherapeutic courses and labs.

PHR 6807:  Geriatrics

Students will learn the principles of patient-centered care in the geriatric population as well as the role and responsibilities of the senior care pharmacist. 

PHR 6808:  Heart Failure

This elective is an interactive and activity-based course. Using heart failure treatment as the patient care topic, students will learn the pharmacist’s role as a member of the health care team. In class, students will learn how to read journal articles and provide patient education. Students will develop appropriate treatment recommendations using a team approach to care for patients with heart failure. 

PHR 6809:  Integrative Therapeutics

This elective course examines the role of nutritional supplements pertaining to health and wellness. Emphasis will be placed on scientific evidence in the support of supplementations, and students will gain knowledge on what products are considered both safe and effective.

PHR 6810:  Introduction to Residency

This elective course is designed for students that are interested in pursuing a residency. Students will be educated on all residency opportunities, the residency selection process, and things to consider when selecting residency programs. Also, the students will develop curriculum vitae and learn important interviewing techniques to use during a residency interview.

PHR 6811:  Landmark Trials I

This course will focus on landmark clinical trials that have influenced the way medications are used in clinical practice.  Students will learn to critically evaluate these trials and to identify consistencies or inconsistencies with the currently established therapeutic guidelines.

PHR 6812:  Landmark Trials II

This course will focus on landmark clinical trials that have influenced the way medications are used in clinical practice.  Students will learn to critically evaluate these trials and to identify consistencies or inconsistencies with the currently established therapeutic guidelines.

PHR 6813:  Leadership

This course is designed to help students learn what it means to be a leader. During the course students will analyze their personality traits and leadership style and how to work with those who have traits that differ. Additionally, students will learn about emotional intelligence, conflict management and leadership theory. The course will utilize current literature as a starting point to discuss and debate leadership.

PHR 6814:  Learn to Teach

This course is an elective offering that is intended to give pharmacy students a general overview of the organizational structure of academia, as well introduce possible career opportunities in academia.  This course will also teach students how to utilize skills such as active learning, visual aids, and vocal variety in order to become effective communicators in the classroom setting.  Students will be given opportunities during class to enhance assessment, verbal, and written skills through various in-class assignments.  

PHR 6815:  Managed Care

This elective course will provide an overview of managed care pharmacy and an understanding of how managed care impacts the entire healthcare system. Topics will range from pharmacy benefits design to emerging markets in specialty pharmaceuticals.   Students will leave this course with a knowledge of managed care pharmacy that can prepare them for experiential education and career opportunities in a variety of managed care practice settings.

PHR 6816:  Medical Spanish

This course is designed to develop the Spanish-speaking skills of the non-Spanish speaking healthcare professional. It will build on skills of basic Spanish vocabulary and pronunciation and will develop basic conversational skills as well as pharmacy-specific and medical terms, phrases, and counseling points.  Emphasis will be placed on developing sufficient skills to provide adequate pharmaceutical care to Spanish-speaking patients that speak little or no English.  The course will also provide key phrases and general questions to use when counseling or assessing the patient.  The course will also provide insight into Hispanic/Latin culture and address how to handle and understand cultural differences in health beliefs and practices.

PHR 6817:  Mental Health

This course provides the student with an introduction to the mental health system and various psychiatric disease states and treatments. This is a general introduction/review on the common psychiatric disorders, more in-depth pharmacologic/nonpharmacologic treatment options, and includes unique subject matter. The mental health elective will utilize the experiences of faculty and guest lecturers that practice in the field of psychiatry.

PHR 6818:  NanoMedicine

This course will focus on developing students’ understanding of the unique properties of nanomaterials used in nanomedicines, their fabrication and characterization, and nanodrug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Emphasis will be placed on FDA approved nanomedicines, their specific uses and advantages compared to conventional counterparts, nanotechnology-enabled diagnostic and contrast agents, and the simultaneous diagnostic/treatment modalities. An introduction to theranostics and personalized medicine will also be included.

PHR 6819:  Palliative Care

In this course, students will see how the philosophy of palliative care extends through the initial diagnosis of an end stage illness to death.  The course will address pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments as well as other interdisciplinary interventions which can improve symptoms and quality of life. The Palliative Care Course will utilize the experiences of faculty and guest lecturers in the field of palliative and end of life care. 

PHR 6820:  Pediatrics

This course is an elective offering that is intended to introduce students to pediatric topics encountered in a “general medicine” setting including ambulatory and inpatient hospital settings. The focus of the class will be practical implementation of general medicine principles directed at a pharmacist’s point of view.  Students will gain comfort with basic pediatric pharmacy principles and knowledge of pediatric pharmacy specific resources.  The format of the class will mostly be an open forum discussion.

PHR 6821:  Veterinary Medicine

To review the role of the pharmacist in dispensing medications and making treatment recommendations for animals.

PHR 6822:  Wilderness Medicine

This course introduces a quick and decisive approach in the management of common outdoor medical emergencies otherwise known as “Wilderness Medicine”.

PHR 6823:  Women’s Health

This course will include discussions on several topics regarding health issues/conditions that primarily affect women.  In-class activities will assist with the application of the material to patient situations.  Additionally, controversial topics in women’s health will be investigated and debated by members of the course.

PHR 6824:  Xenobiotic Toxicology

This course emphasizes adverse health effects caused by environmental toxicants and xenobiotics (foreign agents). The contribution of environmental toxicants to the development and progression of diseases will be discussed. This course provides information on traditional topics of toxicology as well as modern research methods in toxicology.

PHR 6825:  Independent Study

The individual topic will be determined by course faculty.

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